ABSTRACTS

FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF DISEASES CAUSING VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

 Iheanacho C. Ohaji; icohaji@gmail.com

Department of Optometry, St. Joseph’s Eye hospital, Mgbirichi,
Ohaji/Ebema LGA, Owerri, Imo State.

Abstart

Visual impairment can be described as that condition which leads to abnormality in the function of an individual. It is a limitation in one or overall functioning of the visual system. Visual impairment is brought about by visual disorder. The clinical tests of physiological function such as visual acuity, colour vision, visual field, contrast sensitivity, glare sensitivity, etc are measures of visual impairment. On a recognized and standardized test the patient does not perform well as ‘normal’. Whether impairment is disabling depends on the task to be performed or the practical skill to be exercised. This study is aimed at bringing to bare the relationship between visual impairment and visual function. It also explains and provides ways of managing the effects of visual impairment on visual function of patients.

Key words: Visual impairment, visual function, colour vision, contras sensitivity, visual field, glare sensitivity, visual acuity.

UNDERSTANDING PROFESSIONAL AND FAMILY DYNAMICS IN EYE HEALTH CARE  – OUR RESPONSIBILITY

 Oriowo, Matthew Olanrewaju

Department of Optometry, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria

Abstract:

Long-term plan and funds are essential ingredients in accessible every aspect of health care. The fact that education, professional training and family dynamics play major roles in eye healthcare cannot be overemphasized. Basic characteristics for quality healthcare with standard professionalism include determination, focus, commitment, effective communication, creativity, problem solving and innovation. Education is the bedrock of all sectors in the society. Professional training systems andthe proportion of family own health care undertakings relate to the level of eye health care.The effective harnessing of resources is essential for the sustainability of the affordable eye care delivery, which will in turn positively impact the society. This presentation will address our understanding of the interconnectionbetween professionalism, family dynamics and better eye health for all.

 

 

EYE SAFETY FOR ALL: OCULAR SAFETY IN BOTTLING INDUSTRIES – A CASE STUDY.

 Juno Ohiremere Okukpon;  juno.okukpon@uniben.edu.

Contributors: Dr. Isoken Okosun
The Department of Optometry, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Benin.

Abstract

Ocular trauma occurs at anywhere and anytime regardless of the age of individuals involved. This study assessed the knowledge, practice and attitude of 203 workers of two bottling companies in Edo State to ocular safety and predisposing factors to ocular hazards. A structured questionnaire administered to workers of two bottling companies was used. Visual acuity test, external and ophthalmoscopic examinations were carried out on all participants. This study showed 39% and 61% of workers recruited for the study in the two companies respectively had been involved in eye injuries. Majority owned personal protective equipment (PPE) and safety goggles being the most common. The use of PPE among workers in one of the companies was moderately low and ocular PPE use significantly correlated with level of education, method of training and nature of activities involved in (p< 0.05). This low use of PPE had a significant negative effect on the ocular health of workers as they are exposed to all sorts of ocular hazards associated with the work place. The major reasons for low PPE compliance were unavailability of PPE to workers and negligence of the workers to PPE use. It is therefore, recommended that ocular safety information and PPEs be provided to specifically target the poor attitudes of workers towards occupational eye safety. Proper work strategies should also be put in place in order to minimize the occurrences of accident in the work places especially accidents from exploding glass bottled drinks.

Keywords: Ocular Safety, Ocular hazards, Eye injuries, Personal protective equipment.

VISION THERAPY IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

Maduakolam, Alwell O.D.

Abstract

The need for vision therapy services continues to increase as more binocular vision disorders defy routine/primary care management. Some binocular vision disorders masquerade as refractive errors and often poorly managed. The goal of the presentation is to use classical clinical cases of vision problem disorders- presentations, assessment, diagnosis, progressive vision therapy and result /outcome. Some vision problems that are encountered in primary care optometric clinics can only be successfully diagnosed and treated in specialized vision therapy clinic. This presentation attempts to use clinical cases to highlight common vision problems that are seen in primary care setting that can best be managed with vision therapy. It is also aimed to draw the attention of practicing optometrists in Nigeria of the availability of vision therapy option for management of some vision problems/disorders which go beyond spectacles and contact lenses. Emphasis is made on how to identify when a patient needs a vision therapy evaluation, how to refer appropriately to vision therapy specialist whilst retaining the patient in the process.

Keywords: Vision Therapy, binocular vision disorders, diagnosis, management, spectacles, contact lenses

CHALLENGES IN MANAGING MONOCULAR PATIENTS; A COMBINED EFFORT OF THE OCULARIST, OPHTHALMOLOGIST, OPTOMETRIST AND PSYCHOLOGIST

Okpara Victor Iheanacho; theocularist@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Monocular patients constitute 5% of ophthalmic patients being managed on ophthalmic facilities. These patients express regular dissatisfaction with ophthalmic care especially in developing countries like Nigeria. Satisfaction of the needs of these patients can be achieved from combined management of the Ocularist, Ophthalmologist, Optometrist and Psychologist. In medical practice, patient’s satisfaction should be met physically, psychologically and emotionally. These three conditions should be the aim of monocular patients’ management. Highlighting the needs of monocular patients and creating measures to meet these needs. Inform practitioners of their role in meeting needs of monocular patients. Inform practitioners of new trends and discoveries in oculoplastics which may benefit well being of monocular patients. Establish a forum for interaction with practitioners involved to provide optimum service delivery.

This paper highlights the challenges in managing monocular patients. Specialist consultation with monocular patients should satisfy them physically, psychologically and emotionally. It offers better options to management of monocular patients and highlights important aspects that are being neglected. It also beams on essentials to be looked into while optimizing available vision.

Methodology; Clinic feedbacks, Optical principles, Advances in oculoplastic procedures for monocular patients.

Results; Combined management of monocular patients by the ocularist, Ophthalmologist, Optometrist and Psychologist improves quality of life.

Conclusion; Loss of an eye should not mean loss of quality of life, efforts are to be made as practitioners to ease unpleasant situations for monocular patients.

Key words; Ocularist, Ophthalmologist, Oculoplastic, Optometrist, Psychologist, Monocular patients.

A SURVEY ON DISTRIBUTION AND CAUSES OF LOW VISION AND BLINDNESS AMONG CHILDREN IN A SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND IN THE FEDERAL CAPITAL TERRITORY

 Onyema, Prisca (OD, MPH)

Oguamah, Felix (BSc, OD, FNCO)

ABSTRACT

This survey was undertaken to find out the distribution and causes of low vision and blindness among pupils in a school for the blind in the Federal Capital Territory (F.C.T). Approval was obtained from the principal of the school and informed consent was got from parents at a Parents’ Teachers’ Association (PTA) meeting. A direct ocular examination was conducted on a total of 66 pupils at the school for the blind. Visual acuity, external examination, ophthalmoscopy, retinoscopy, and visual field tests were conducted on the pupils. Glaucoma was the leading cause of blindness (27.27%), followed by corneal opacity (21.21%). The prevalence of moderate low vision among the students was 0% and prevalence of severe low vision was 12.12%. Profound low vision was found in 21.21% of the students. 63.64% of the students examined had no light perception while 36.36% had some form of vision left. From the survey, preventable causes of blindness were responsible for 70% of blindness. Two students were found to have mild visual impairment and have been recommended for dehabilitation from the schools for the blind and possible reintegration into sighted schools. Health care and health education are key areas that the government needs to improve on to reduce cases of preventable blindness.

*Key Words: Low Vision, Blindness, Prevalence, Glaucoma, Corneal Opacity